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     Fluoroquinolone List and Generations

Please Note: I carry this Alert everywhere I go in a special case along with my meds.  It is always with me.   Why? After reading the stories of countless FQ Victims and speaking with a good many, I instinctively know that if I end up in a Hospital or Emergency Room, the first thing an attendant will do is hook me up to an IV full of Levaquin.

ALERT:  Under no circumstances are these medications to be administered to Judith Cohen. She is in the midst of a severe adverse drug reaction to Levaquin, taken in the winter of 2009.

My husband carries my case around because I cannot bear weight of any kind.  Under the Alert are the following Fluoroquinolone Generations:

First-generation
  • cinoxacin (Cinobac) (Removed from clinical use)
  • flumequine (Flubactin) (Genotoxic carcinogen)(Veterinary use)
  • nalidixic acid (NegGam, Wintomylon) (Genotoxic carcinogen)
  • oxolinic acid (Uroxin) (Currently unavailable in the United States)
  • piromidic acid (Panacid)(Currently unavailable in the United States)
  • pipemidic acid (Dolcol)(Currently unavailable in the United States)
  • rosoxacin (Eradacil)(Restricted use, currently unavailable in the United States)

The second-generation class is sometimes subdivided into "Class 1" and "Class 2".

  • ciprofloxacin (Ciprobay, Cipro, Ciproxin)
  • enoxacin (Enroxil, Penetrex) (Removed from clinical use)
  • fleroxacin (Megalone, Roquinol) (Removed from clinical use)
  • lomefloxacin (Maxaquin)(Discontinued in the United States)
  • nadifloxacin (Acuatim, Nadoxin, Nadixa)(Currently unavailable in the United States)
  • norfloxacin (Lexinor, Noroxin, Quinabic, Janacin) (restricted use)
  • ofloxacin (Floxin, Oxaldin, Tarivid) (Only as opthalmic in the United States)
  • pefloxacin (Peflacine) (Currently unavailable in the United States)
  • rufloxacin (Uroflox) (Currently unavailable in the United States)

Third-generation

Unlike the first- and second-generations, the third-generation is active against streptococci:

  • balofloxacin (Baloxin) (Currently unavailable in the United States)
  • gatifloxacin (Tequin) (Zymar -opth.) (Tequin removed from clinical use) [Sometimes reported as 4th generation]
  • grepafloxacin (Raxar) (Removed from clinical use)
  • levofloxacin (Cravit, Levaquin)
  • moxifloxacin (Avelox,vigamox) (restricted use). [Sometimes reported as 4th generation]
  • pazufloxacin (pasil, Pazucross) (Currently unavailable in the United States)
  • sparfloxacin (Zagam) (restricted use)
  • temafloxacin (Omniflox) (Removed from clinical use)
  • tosufloxacin (Ozex, Tosacin) (Currently unavailable in the United States)

Fourth-generation

  • clinafloxacin (Currently unavailable in the United States)
  • gemifloxacin (Factive)(Currently unavailable in the United States)
  • sitafloxacin (Gracevit) (Currently unavailable in the United States)
  • trovafloxacin (Trovan) (Removed from clinical use)
  • prulifloxacin (Quisnon) (Currently unavailable in the United States)

In development

  • garenoxacin (Geninax)(Application withdrawn due to toxicity issues)
  • delafloxacin

If you have become extremely ill with strange or disturbing symptoms, look through the list above to determine if your illness occurred after taking any of the Fluoroquinolones mentioned. If you have taken any of the above mentioned Fluoroquinolones, please do not take any again, even if you were not adversely affected.

Remember:  They are to be used in life and death situations and only as a “last” line of defense.